All posts by Freddie Holding

Reviews

Fantastic, educational game. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 12 March 2020
Great fun while also learning some interesting facts!

Easy to learn, hard to master. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 2020
Thoroughly enjoyed this game, would recommend.

Clever game, great for all ages and families
22 September 2015
Very well presented and laid out board game – the design really caught my eye in the shop and when we played it at home it was easy to pick up. The game involves strategy so it gets quite addictive! Educational and very topical.

Article on linkedin

EPHEMERIS could be the choice game for your Christmas gathering, however small, with a Solar System Quiz game of over 200 questions covering everything from Luna1 to Falcon9 missions and everything in between, as well as all about the planets, their moons and the star system they belong to.

No need for previous knowledge of astronomy to play, but you will certainly know more when your planet has completed its orbit in the Ephemeris Solar System Quiz game. Beware of being out-smarted by your 9 year old !

Multi-choice answers, however, take the pressure off our generally embarrassing lack of knowledge about what is above and all around us.

See full article here:
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/e-ephemeris-christmas-quiz-freddie-holding/

Review from Astrodienst

Reviewed by Karin Hoffmann, 2020

What shall it be? – Strategy and Luck or Cleverness and Cunning?

EPHEMERIS is a well-made and beautifully laid-out game that offers something for everyone: fun, luck, strategy, knowledge, and – above all – a good time together.

The box contains a playing board showing the zodiac and the orbits of the different planets – or rather planet categories (inner and outer planets, the Sun and the Moon). The pieces representing the planets are made of wood and come in different colours, according to their category. Like the whole set, they are a pleasure to the senses and proof of the care that went into the making of the game.

Variant 1 can be played as a board game like any other, as no special field of knowledge or interest is required – though it is a nice feeling to travel through the solar system.

Variant 2 – the Quiz requires a certain interest in astronomy. Beware astrologers, it really IS more about astronomy than astrology. But still, it is well worth the while to get to know the more ʹmaterialʹ sister science of the art of astrology.

Read the full review here:

https://www.astro.com/astrology/in_rev_ephemerisgame_e.htm

International dark sky week

Its International Dark Sky Week.

During this week of the new moon in April its a great time to gaze in wonder at the clear night skies having turned off our outside lighting where we can to do our bit to reduct light pollution in the world.

Importantly, light pollution affects so many creatures such as the orientation of nocturnal birds in flight, feeding behaviour of insects, bats, fish and reptiles and even the growth pattern of trees.

While we may not sleep so well with bright street lighting, the International Dark-Sky Association likewise urges action to be taken by governments to heed this disruption to organic life.

At the same time, the economy of energy is an important factor in trying to achieve a global effort at reducing light pollution for the benefit of us all.

AUGUST 7TH – ephemeris/spacestore quiz! online

The next quiz is on Friday August 7th at 5:30pm.

A fun and family-friendly game with 3 rounds of 10 questions all about the planets, their moons, space missions and more from the EPHEMERIS quiz game.
It’s A or B answers – so don’t worry if you are not too savvy with our solar system.

This is a webinar so no need to dress up!

Register:
If you fancy the challenge, please do register with SpaceStore @spacestore.co/events

Saturn overtakes Jupiter as planet with most moons

A team discovered a haul of 20 new moons orbiting the ringed planet, bringing its total to 82; Jupiter, by contrast, has 79 natural satellites. Each of the newly discovered objects in orbit around Saturn is about 5km (three miles) in diameter; 17 of them orbit the planet “backwards”. The moons were discovered using the Subaru telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii.

By Paul Rincon Science editor, BBC News website

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-49962134